The cybersecurity implications of the Russion invasion of Ukraine

Andrew Hampton, Director General of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB)

Thursday, 19th May 2022 7:30pm

Wairarapa

Rosewood, 417 Queen Street, Kuripuni, Masterton

"There has been," our guest speaker says, "an unprecedented release of declassified intelligence in countering the Russia information war - as well as the Russian malicious cyber activity that has been observed in the lead-up and during the invasion."

As he says, Aotearoa New Zealand’s cyber security landscape is continuously evolving, notwithstanding the heightened vigilance as a result of February’s illegal Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The GCSB’s three key functions are:

  • collecting and assessing foreign intelligence in accordance with Government’s intelligence priorities;
  • providing cyber security and information assurance services for nationally significant organisations; and
  • assisting NZ Defence Force, NZ Police and NZ Security Intelligence Service to undertake their lawful functions, including counter-terrorism and support to military operations.

“The role, function and capability of the government’s signals intelligence agency is often regarded to be shrouded in secrecy, but a surprising amount can be talked about,” he says.  “The GCSB exists to protect New Zealand as a free, open and democratic society.”

Andrew Hampton’s talk will also explore cyber security in Aotearoa New Zealand beyond the Russia-Ukraine conflict, including the type and scale of cyber threats on our organisations of national significance.

Prior to joining the GCSB. Mr Hampton spent much of his career in the justice sector, including Treaty settlement negotiations and courts administration. 

He was Director of the Office of Treaty Settlements, Deputy Secretary for Courts, and Deputy Chief Executive at the Crown Law Office.

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Contact the Wairarapa branch

IAN F GRANT, CO-CHAIR

ifgrant@xtra.co.nz

"There has been," our guest speaker says, "an unprecedented release of declassified intelligence in countering the Russia information war - as well as the Russian malicious cyber activity that has been observed in the lead-up and during the invasion."

As he says, Aotearoa New Zealand’s cyber security landscape is continuously evolving, notwithstanding the heightened vigilance as a result of February’s illegal Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The GCSB’s three key functions are:

  • collecting and assessing foreign intelligence in accordance with Government’s intelligence priorities;
  • providing cyber security and information assurance services for nationally significant organisations; and
  • assisting NZ Defence Force, NZ Police and NZ Security Intelligence Service to undertake their lawful functions, including counter-terrorism and support to military operations.

“The role, function and capability of the government’s signals intelligence agency is often regarded to be shrouded in secrecy, but a surprising amount can be talked about,” he says.  “The GCSB exists to protect New Zealand as a free, open and democratic society.”

Andrew Hampton’s talk will also explore cyber security in Aotearoa New Zealand beyond the Russia-Ukraine conflict, including the type and scale of cyber threats on our organisations of national significance.

Prior to joining the GCSB. Mr Hampton spent much of his career in the justice sector, including Treaty settlement negotiations and courts administration. 

He was Director of the Office of Treaty Settlements, Deputy Secretary for Courts, and Deputy Chief Executive at the Crown Law Office.

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